Adult & Family Programs

Come up to camp for some “unplugged” time with family and friends, both new and old. We offer programming for both adults and kids, free time for hiking, fishing, napping, games, and simply enjoying the beauty of the Boulder River Valley, and other activities and worship designed for all.

Options include a work weekend to help get camp ready for the season, a continuing education week for clergy and interested laypeople, and a weekend family camp. Christikon staff serve as hosts, offer options for children during adult sessions, and lead games, hikes, worship and other activities. Meals are made from scratch and served family-style around large tables.

Memorial Day Work Weekend

3 Nights

Help prepare Christikon for the summer season during this “long weekend” that includes Memorial Day. We provide food, lodging, fellowship, work, and worship opportunities―all without cost (except a charge per room for those in the Living Center). Bring with you a willing spirit, hand tools for various maintenance, repair, sewing, and cleaning projects, and plenty of elbow grease. Meals are served from Friday supper through Monday lunch.

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Developmentally Disabled Adults Session

3 Nights

For adults 18 years and older whose disability is primarily connected with mental development, Christikon’s camp for the developmentally disabled offers opportunities for enjoyment of the mountains and growth in caring relationships. Included are hiking, group recreation, crafts, work projects, shared responsibilities, sharing of talents, music, etc. Christikon staff people reside in the cabins with the campers, and provide program leadership.

Register & More Info.

Continuing Education Retreat

3 Nights

Running from Monday supper through Thursday lunch, this retreat is designed particularly for rostered ministers, interested lay people, and their families. It is sponsored with the ELCA Montana Synod’s continuing education program. Our special guests and program will be announced soon!

Register & More Info.

Dr. Hans Wiersma

Bio:

Dr. Hans Wiersma is a Religion Professor and historian at Augsburg College (Minneapolis, Minnesota) where he teaches courses such as “The Lutheran Heritage” and “Church: Past Present, Future.”

His published work includes Luther the Reformer, Second Edition (2016), as well as entries in The Lutheran Handbook (vols. I and II), People of Faith Bible Study Series, Crazy Talk: A Not-So-Stuffy Dictionary of Theological Terms, Crazy Book: A Not-So-Stuffy Dictionary of Biblical Terms and By Heart: Conversations with Luther’s Small Catechism.

In the two-year period straddling the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation, Hans made seven trips to Wittenberg and surrounding Luther sites, and delivered more than fifty presentations, lectures, and papers on Luther and the Reformation.

Hans is an ordained Lutheran pastor; prior to joining Augsburg’s faculty in 2004, he served congregations in the Netherlands, California, and Minnesota.

Hans lives in St. Paul, Minnesota, with his wife, Kristin, and children, Elianna, Garret, and Marielle. Hans’s eldest son, Jacob, lives in Missoula. Hans likes to read non-fiction and travel.

Session Topic:

“Luther at the Wartburg: the 10-month Personal Retreat that Changed the World.” The 500th anniversary of Luther’s kidnapping is coming up in May. What he produced during his time in the Wartburg–including his work translating the NT into German–is mindboggling. And the story of how he got there (Diet of Worms, Here I Stand, Kidnapped and hidden at the order of is Prince) and what his life was like while there (including a brutal bout of constipation about which we have much detail) are well worth diving into.

Aana Marie Vigen

Bio:

Aana Marie Vigen is an Associate Professor of Christian Social Ethics at Loyola University Chicago. Dr. Vigen earned a BA in Spanish, Religion, and Hispanic Studies from St. Olaf College, an MA in Theology and Ethics jointly conferred by the Graduate Theological Union and Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, and a PhD in Social and Theological Ethics from Union Theological Seminary in New York City. She is a member of the Society of Christian Ethics (SCE) and the American Academy of Religion (AAR). Dr. Vigen is also an active lay member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and served on the national ELCA Genetics Taskforce from 2008–2011. She offers courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Topic:

Taking Stock of Racism.” We’ll define it, think about our part in it, and the implicit biases, assumptions and stereotypes that get in the way of fostering good and healthy relationships across racial differences. We’ll also consider strategies and steps for white folk to become better allies, and practice how to talk about it with each other and in our faith communities.

Session A

Taking Stock of Who We Are, Where We Come From, & Why We are Here.

The facilitator will share some of her own story as to how and why I have come to be invested in white anti-racism work and will invite participants to do the same via individual reflection. There will be time for participants to share a bit of their journey in small group discussion (pairs if possible). Possible Pre-Reading: Ch. 1 & 6, Raising White Kids by J. Harvey.

Session C

Defining Racism & Glimpsing Its Effects on Housing & Wealth 

This session will explore the social determinants of health & well-being by looking at the historical processes that have shaped the vast inequalities in housing and in the accumulation of wealth. It will touch on the significance of The Great Migration, Urban Renewal, Racial Redlining, the GI Bill, School Segregation/Busing and how those dynamics still affect where folks live, the resources they have, the stress they experience, and the toll it takes on their overall health. Possible video to watch: also view 25 minutes of “The House We Live In”, Part 3 of the PBS series Race: The Power of an Illusion or the PBS documentary by Bob Herbert: Against All Odds: Chasing the Dream: https://www.pbs.org/wnet/chasing-the-dream/films/against-all-odds/

Possible pre-reading: “What is Racism?” by Ijeoma Oluo, Ch. 2, So You Want to Talk About Race?.

Session E

A Focus on Implicit Bias, Assumptions, Stereotypes & Micro-aggressions 

This session will explore how implicit bias and stereotypes get in the way of fostering good/healthy relationships across racial differences and how we can become more aware of these dynamics and work to minimize them in our own lives.

Session G

Strategies & Steps for White Folk to Become Better Allies 

In this session, I ask participants to think concretely about our own lives and commitments. How can we act in ways that move the needle in our own lives/spheres of influence? Participants will first map these spheres. Together, we will explore practical work, e.g. being intentional in how we engage with our families, friends, and enact our vocations. We will explore what being an ally really looks like and how we can work on issues that profoundly affect the lives of communities of color. Possible pre-reading: “Talking is Great, but What Else Can I do?” by Oluo (PDF of Ch. 17, So You Want to Talk about Race?); “For White Women Learning Calculus in a School Building on Fire” by Jennifer Harvey. “What Does Resistance Look Like” also by Harvey (PDF of Ch. 7, Raising White Kids).

Mountain Weekend

2 Nights

Christikon summer staff serve as hosts for each family, and offer options for children during sessions for adults. They are available for child care at other times as well. Meals are served Friday supper through Sunday lunch. Can easily be paired with registering for the Continuing Ed Retreat as well.

Register & More Info.

Dr. Hans Wiersma

Bio:

Dr. Hans Wiersma is a Religion Professor and historian at Augsburg College (Minneapolis, Minnesota) where he teaches courses such as “The Lutheran Heritage” and “Church: Past Present, Future.”

His published work includes Luther the Reformer, Second Edition (2016), as well as entries in The Lutheran Handbook (vols. I and II), People of Faith Bible Study Series, Crazy Talk: A Not-So-Stuffy Dictionary of Theological Terms, Crazy Book: A Not-So-Stuffy Dictionary of Biblical Terms and By Heart: Conversations with Luther’s Small Catechism.

In the two-year period straddling the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation, Hans made seven trips to Wittenberg and surrounding Luther sites, and delivered more than fifty presentations, lectures, and papers on Luther and the Reformation.

Hans is an ordained Lutheran pastor; prior to joining Augsburg’s faculty in 2004, he served congregations in the Netherlands, California, and Minnesota.

Hans lives in St. Paul, Minnesota, with his wife, Kristin, and children, Elianna, Garret, and Marielle. Hans’s eldest son, Jacob, lives in Missoula. Hans likes to read non-fiction and travel.

Session Topic:

“Luther at the Wartburg: the 10-month Personal Retreat that Changed the World.” The 500th anniversary of Luther’s kidnapping is coming up in May. What he produced during his time in the Wartburg–including his work translating the NT into German–is mindboggling. And the story of how he got there (Diet of Worms, Here I Stand, Kidnapped and hidden at the order of is Prince) and what his life was like while there (including a brutal bout of constipation about which we have much detail) are well worth diving into.

Former Staff Reunion

3 Nights

More details about this session coming soon…

Register & More Info.

Adult Backpacking

Dates and Fees to be arranged as needed

Christikon can host groups of adults (couples, young adults, one-gender groups, older adults, etc.) in the magnificent mountain wilderness surrounding camp. Groups must have at least six people, and can have no more than twelve. Two Christikon staff lead each group.

Dates can be arranged within the context of youth camp trails sessions. Youth sessions cover six nights (four in the backcountry, first and last nights at camp). Your group can reduce the number of days in the back country to 2 or 3; but at least 3 is recommended.

You arrive the afternoon of the first day of the session, stay overnight at camp for orientation and packing-out, and head into the wilderness the next morning. You remain in the back country for 2, 3, or 4 nights, and return to Christikon the afternoon of your last day on the trail. Typically, the group leaves Christikon early the next morning after staying overnight at camp, but some adult groups may choose to leave Christikon once they are packed in and cleaned up. Your route can be tailored to your group. You may do a three or four-night backcountry loop, or you may arrange for setting up a two to four-night base camp from which you day-hike (so you carry packs only the first and last days). Our staff people can lead the program; or they can work with you in shared program leadership for Bible study, Quiet Time and worship. You may also register as a CreationCare session.

CreationCare is arranged with Director Mark Donald, if you do have a group of at least 6 that would be interested in booking, please contact us. CreationCare is much like backpacking. You and your group set up a base cap in the wilderness above our main site. You share in the regular Christikon trails program, including worship and Bible study. You’ll spend about eight hours of work each day helping to build and repair Forest Service trails, or rehabilitating damaged areas in the wilderness. The session is 7 days, 6 nights. Minimum group size is 6 guests; maximum group size is 13 guests.

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